Coach Brad · Coaching · Leadership · Success

The Elephant in the Coaches Room

A typical day in the life of Coach…

mce-basketball-coachThe standard day begins at 6 AM when Coach gets out of bed to begin the day. Helping his wife with two kids in the morning, grabbing breakfast for the road, and driving to school is always a rushed morning. In season, this is the only time besides weekends that Coach is able to interact with his own children. At school, Coach teaches six physical education classes with one planning period as the day concludes at 3 PM. The planning period during the day allows Coach to plan his practice session and watch video of future opponents.

Next, comes the part of the day that Coach loves…Practice. Coach is the Varsity boys’ basketball coach at the local high school. Coach oversees the Junior Varsity practice from 3:15-4:45 and then he runs the varsity session from 4:45-6:30. It was a successful practice that led to personal growth as a coach as well as player development. Coach is very good and because of his level of dedication over the course of numerous years, his teams have been a success and his players have moved on to solid colleges and careers. After the conclusion of the 6:30 practice, Coach quickly goes to the fast food drive-thru, picks up his meal, and heads off to scout a future opponent who has a game that night at 7:30.

This coaching life is happening while Coaches wife takes the kids to their after-school activities, feeds them dinner, and helps them with homework. Following homework, she tucks them into bed by herself once again. On the other hand, Coach is excited because of the perfect timing involved with the game he is going to scout and that he will be able to see tip-off. Coach creates a great scouting report and is on the road home by 9:30. The 45-minute drive home allows him to give a kiss to his kids that went to bed at 7:30 and quietly sneak into his bed with his wife who fell asleep at 9:30.

With the alarm set for tomorrow morning at 6 AM, Coach is extremely excited about his games tomorrow night. The JV game will begin at 5:30 and the Varsity at 7:30 allowing Coach to be involved in both games. The free time after school will be dedicated to watching video of future opponents. Coach will be home earlier than an away game if everything goes as planned plus his wife and kids will be attending the varsity game so they will get to watch him doing what he loves…The perfect night!!!

Coaches – Does this life sound familiar to you? Are you feeling demands from your personal and professional life in which you feel out of control? How does the “wife” feel in the above story about the current state of the relationship? Do your own expectations for excellent job performance push you to workweeks that include 70 or more hours, health risks caused by stress and being overworked, and loss of family time?

Athletic coaching does not include the traditional 9 to 5 work life nor does it feature a time clock when work begins or ends. This type of environment could lead to coaches performing work activities at all hours of the day in order to complete the perceived amount of work needed to have a better opportunity for what is deemed success. Unfortunately, this coaching scenario eliminates time for mental and physical recovery away from coaching duties that would lead to increased health and life satisfaction. Is life success and harmony even possible for coaches and their families?

Be on the lookout next week when we discuss three strategies for increased harmony between work and life.

Empowering athletes, families, coaches, and organizations to create opportunities for lifetime success,

Coach Brad

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One thought on “The Elephant in the Coaches Room

  1. Hey…suck it up coach and realize it’s only for the season… and let the family know that they’re welcome to come to the games to watch their dad/mom in action. Of course, if he/she caches two (or three) sports, that’s other story…and too much!
    Love your blog posts,
    Maddie

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